Garden Dilemmas, Delights & Discoveries, Ask Mary Stone, New Jersey Garden blog

Gardening in the Rain

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Hello fellow readers, Last week, we were on deck for new plantings for clients nearby, but heavy rains were in the forecast. While a drizzle or overcast skies are ideal for planting, when it’s raining cats and dogs, it’s not. Just as walking around soggy soil is not good for existing plants, planting in the saturated dirt is harmful. It compresses the soil inhibiting adequate oxygen and root growth. So, as it turned out, we placed the plants in position and planted them after things dried out enough. So, what tasks are ideal for gardening in the rain?

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Planting in saturated soil is harmful to new plants.

Gardening in the rain is a perfect time to weed undesirables.

One of the chores ideal to do in the rain, or soon after, is weeding, again, being careful not to tromp too near desirable plants. It makes for easy pulling and a better likelihood of getting to the root of things. Removing the taproot is critical for invasive intruders such as mugwort and the stealth ragweed, which has no showy flower, unlike the glorious goldenrod, also in bloom this time of year, that wrongly takes the rap for itchy eyes. (Check out a previous column on the topic- link below).

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One of the chores ideal to do in the rain, or soon after, is weeding. Stilt grass be-gone!

Where’s Dr. Doolittle when you need him?

Over the weekend, I finally had a few hours to tend to my garden, which is chockfull of undesirables. My mission was to tackle the Japanese stilt grass (Microstegium vimineum), also known as Mary’s grass, though I take no ownership. The mini-bamboo-looking trespasser is easy to pull. It’s an annual grass so getting the entire root is not critical as with other weeds. Still, the seeds are viable for five or more years so pulling or weed whacking it before it goes to seed is vital unless you have some way of convincing deer stilt grass is delicious. Where’s Dr. Doolittle when you need him?

We’ve talked before about how too much rain along with warm temps can create mayhem for fungi and bacteria dilemmas. And it has! So while you’re weeding, remove decaying, diseased, or fungi-ridden branches, foliage, or other “droppings.” Then,  dispose of debris far away from your garden or in plastic bags to head to the dump. I know, not the best practice to add to the wasteland, which will outlive us all, but certain diseases warrant containment, such as the highly contagious canker disease killing off spruces from the bottom up.

The origin of “Raining Cats and Dogs.” 

So, what is it with the saying Raining Cats and Dogs anyway; one of my dear old mom’s favorite idioms. When have we’ve ever seen cats or dogs falling from the sky? According to The Library of Congress, “We don’t know. The phrase might have its roots in Norse mythology, medieval superstitions, the obsolete word catadupe (waterfall), or dead animals in the streets of Britain being picked up by storm waters.” Bottom line – no one knows or can predict the mysteries of nature. All we can do is help nurture nature the best that we can.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Planting in rain, raining cats and dogs

Yup, those soggy boots are mine :^)

Garden Dilemmas? AskMaryStone@gmail.com

Column Updated 5/5/21

Check out a previous column on Goldenrod’s Bad Reputation

 

 

 

Mary Stone, owner of Stone Associates Landscape Design & Consulting. As a Landscape Designer, I am grateful for the joy of helping others beautify their surroundings which often leads to sharing encouragement and life experiences. These relationships inspired my weekly column published in THE PRESS, 'Garden Dilemmas? Ask Mary', began in 2012. I dream of growing the evolving community of readers into an interactive forum to share encouragement and support in Garden and Personal Recoveries - seeking nature’s inspirations, stimulating growth, weeding undesirables, embracing the unexpected. Thank you for visiting! Mary
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