Garden Dilemmas, Delights & Discoveries, Ask Mary Stone, New Jersey Garden blog

Rose is a rose-pest remedies

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Rose pests, Tent caterpillars, leafhopper, Epsom salt in the garden, leaf hopper

Hello Fellow Readers, Earlier this season, my brother Rick from Knoxville, TN, and a dear friend Ruth of Hope, NJ asked about rose pest remedies and soil requirements to get them off to a good start.

I find roses fussy and hard to keep in their glory. There are spider mites and aphids that often run amok. Never mind the fungus amongst them like black spot and powdery mildew. Then there’s deer who enjoy nibbling, which is odd given their prickly nature. But when roses are in their glory, they surely are glorious. Plus, their fruit called rose hips commonly used in tea, are an excellent source for Vitamin C.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Rose pests, Tent caterpillars, leafhopper, Epsom salt in the garden, leaf hopper, Epsom salt on roses

Plants can’t take up more than they need

Ruth purchased three climbing roses by mail order. While two were off to a good start, the third was not. She contacted Jackson & Perkins, who advised a shot of Epsom salt often does the trick and asked if I had heard of the remedy. Folks use Epsom salt for fertilizing plants, usually tomatoes, to promote more abundant fruit or more flowers. However, unless a soil test proves a deficiency in magnesium and sulfate (the ingredients of Epsom salt), adding more is irrelevant. Plants can’t take up more than they need. They don’t require much of either, and most often, the soil has plenty of magnesium and sulfate naturally. Still, because they gave a plant guarantee, I suggested Ruth follow their protocol so they’ll make-good if necessary.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Rose pests, Tent caterpillars, leafhopper, Epsom salt in the garden, leaf hopper

Rick’s Eastern tent caterpillar nest (Malacosoma americanum).

Brother Rick’s rose dilemma had to do with Eastern tent caterpillars (Malacosoma americanum). In previous years the campers demolished his potted roses but left his other herbs. Rick admitted he’d used a nasty chemical product in the past as a remedy. I sent him the link to an earlier column about tent caterpillars (titled Diehard Campers ). I advised him to remove the tent or apply Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), a naturally occurring bacterium in the soil. Or there’s Neem Oil, a natural alternative to synthetic pesticides. Both are safer for the environment and you.

This week I checked on the progress of their rose dilemmas. No surprise, Ruth’s rose didn’t make a comeback. “We told Jackson and Perkins. Now they are out of them, so we are out of luck!”

It turns out Rick took the advice of his big Sis and removed the tent, so his annual caterpillar invasion was preempted without using chemicals. However, he said his roses still look half defoliated with minimal blooms. I asked that he take a close look for tiny brown or green specks, evidence of mites or aphids. None found. However, he came across a colorful green insect we couldn’t identify. Upon closer inspection, he described, “it’s sparking,” which made me laugh. Leave it to an engineer to associate insect activity with electrical currents. Rick quickly hung up the phone to take photos and a video clip. “Maybe it’s not a spark. It kind of looks like he (she?) is shooting a thread?” His next photo was the clear liquid on a decoy leaf of notepaper. “Too cool to disturb her. Even if it’s bad for the rose!” Garden Dilemmas? AskMaryStone@gmail.com (and now on your favorite Podcast App.)

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Rose pests, Tent caterpillars, leafhopper, Epsom salt in the garden, leaf hopper

Rick’s mystery visitor – a Scarlet-and-green leafhopper / Graphocephala coccinea       I consulted with my birder buddy Dennis who also knows a lot about insects and plants. He identified Rick’s visitor as a Scarlet & Green Leafhopper.  “Cool, isn’t it? It’s found in meadows and gardens. It sucks juices from plants, and it is native.”  

Did you know?  The famous line “Rose is a rose is a rose is a rose,” initially written by Gertrude Stein as part of the 1913 poem “Sacred Emily,” is most understood to mean “things are what they are” — called a proclamation of the law of identity.

Updated 8/10/20

 

 

Mary Stone, owner of Stone Associates Landscape Design & Consulting. As a Landscape Designer, I am grateful for the joy of helping others beautify their surroundings which often leads to sharing encouragement and life experiences. These relationships inspired my weekly column published in THE PRESS, 'Garden Dilemmas? Ask Mary', began in 2012. I dream of growing the evolving community of readers into an interactive forum to share encouragement and support in Garden and Personal Recoveries - seeking nature’s inspirations, stimulating growth, weeding undesirables, embracing the unexpected. Thank you for visiting! Mary

Leave a Reply

*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.