Garden Dilemmas, Delights & Discoveries, Ask Mary Stone, New Jersey Garden blog

About Bottle Trees

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog,Northern New Jersey Landscape Designer, Bottle Tree at Festival Hill

Hello Fellow Readers,

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog,Northern New Jersey Landscape Designer, Bottle Tree at Festival HillHappy 2019. I hope you all survived the fa la las and indulgences that can come along with ringing in the new year. I’ll admit our recycle bin is overflowing with many trendy colors. We hosted Christmas Eve so most of the bounty came from shared toasts, thank you very much.  It makes me think of the bottle tree I saw while visiting Festival Hill in Round Top, Texas. An artful way to make use of recyclables, though it originates long ago. The sign explained, “One of the oddest superstitions from ancient folklore dates back to the glassblowers in ninth-century Africa. Several African tribes employed glass objects as talismans (magical objects) against evil spirits… Ever wonder why bottles moan in the wind?” Fascinating!

With further research, I learned it was believed that evil spirits find their way into inverted glass bottles and become trapped. Then come morning, as the sun beamed onto the bottles, the evil spirits would be destroyed. Sounds like a long-ago cure for the evil spirit of a hangover.

Bottle trees were initially popular primarily in the south, most often in Crape Myrtles trees prevalent there; trees that have died that is. Now they’ve grown to become an admired garden sculpture — colorful assortments of mostly wine bottles inverted on a wrought iron looking post with arms like branches. Blue bottles are the desired dominant color as blue is often associated with ghosts and spirits. Blue also is said to encourage healing. Perhaps that’s what the manufacturers of Milk of Magnesia had in mind. So, after you settle your overindulged holiday tummy, your Phillips Milk of Magnesia will make a nice-looking bottle you can add to your tree.

At Festival Hill they also used bottles stuck upside down in the soil as a garden edge with a cluster of spoons as wind chimes. Some would call it Shabby Chic. But around here it may look like camouflage of a bad habit. About that News Year’s resolution….

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog,Northern New Jersey Landscape Designer, Bottle Tree at Festival Hill, spoon wind chimes

Some would call it Shabby Chic.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog,Northern New Jersey Landscape Designer, Bottle Tree at Festival Hill, Bottle garden edge

But around here it may look like camouflage of a bad habit.

Garden Dilemmas? AskMaryStone@gmail.com

Mary Stone, owner of Stone Associates Landscape Design & Consulting. As a Landscape Designer, I am grateful for the joy of helping others beautify their surroundings which often leads to sharing encouragement and life experiences. These relationships inspired my weekly column published in THE PRESS, 'Garden Dilemmas? Ask Mary', began in 2012. I dream of growing the evolving community of readers into an interactive forum to share encouragement and support in Garden and Personal Recoveries - seeking nature’s inspirations, stimulating growth, weeding undesirables, embracing the unexpected. Thank you for visiting! Mary

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