Garden Dilemmas, Delights & Discoveries, Ask Mary Stone, New Jersey Garden blog

Sweet Autumn Clematis

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Sweet Autumn Clematis, Clematis ternifora, Fall flowering clematis

Hello fellow readers,

One of my favorite vines is the Sweet Autumn Clematis in her glory this time of year with a plethora of tiny white blooms from August through September that looks like a snowdrift and smells heavenly. Once the blooms are spent, a silvery blanket of seed heads follows contrasting beautifully with the dark, almost blue-green leaves. Much to dear Curt’s dislike, I let this beauty scramble up the screened porch stairs and make its way onto the screens themselves. It’s true, you may have to tiptoe around to exit from the porch to the outside; a path rarely taken not because of the sweetie. I just love the fragrance brought in by the cooler evening breeze as I snag the last of the seasons porch campouts on the futon.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Sweet Autumn Clematis, Clematis ternifora, Fall flowering clematis

Sweet Autumn Clematis

I often recommend Sweet Autumn Clematis to replace wisteria or trumpet vines folks start out loving. Until their deck or pergola is destroyed by the strength of their woody vines. My favored climber is equally ambitious, growing 20 feet a season, but is really a softie. Her soft wooded nature won’t harm rails or screens for that matter. Plus, she blooms on new wood so size can easily be managed without missing out on glorious blooms. Each year when dormant, I cut her down to about a foot above ground. But if you have a pergola you are looking to cover, let her run. I’ve even let her scramble as a ground cover with great success. Like all clematis she’s not considered deer resistant; listed as Occasionally Severely Damaged, though I haven’t had Bambi interfere. Unless the ambitious nature allows for nibbles to go unnoticed.

Hardy from zone 5 to 8 (some say 9), like other clematis Clematis ternifora, formerly known as C.maximonicziana, likes cool feet and sunny heads. That means cool roots and sunny foliage for those of you who don’t think of plants as having people-parts. I have one happy Sweet Autumn Clematis doing fine in afternoon shade. Mulch generously or shade roots with a companion plant such as a low growing hydrangea. Ruby Slippers Oakleaf Hydrangea, Hydrangea quercifolia is a favorite that comes to mind.

Others besides Curt are not fans of my sweetie including our industry’s woody plant guru, Michael Dirr. As written in the Manual of Woody Plants, its “Probably the easiest clematis to grow as it seems to thrive with neglect.” Perfect! Then adds it’s “Extremely vigorous to the point of viciousness.” There there worrywarts. Maybe his Georgia garden location has something to do with it. Dirr did end with kudos saying the “soft fragrance is delightful and I’ve allowed the plant to scramble over crape myrtles.” Delightfulness overcomes viciousness. Garden dilemmas? Askmarystone@gmail.com

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Sweet Autumn Clematis, Clematis ternifora, Fall flowering clematis

Sweet Autumn Clematis looking out from my screened porch. What’s not to love?

Mary Stone, owner of Stone Associates Landscape Design & Consulting. As a Landscape Designer, I am grateful for the joy of helping others beautify their surroundings which often leads to sharing encouragement and life experiences. These relationships inspired my weekly column published in THE PRESS, 'Garden Dilemmas? Ask Mary', began in 2012. I dream of growing the evolving community of readers into an interactive forum to share encouragement and support in Garden and Personal Recoveries - seeking nature’s inspirations, stimulating growth, weeding undesirables, embracing the unexpected. Thank you for visiting! Mary

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