Garden Dilemmas, Delights & Discoveries, Ask Mary Stone, New Jersey Garden blog

Doggone Dogwood Disease

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Dogwood Diseases,Anthracnose

Hello fellow readers,

Anthracnose (Ann-thrack-nose, my phonetics) is the most talked about and the most serious amongst the doggone dogwood dilemmas. Though powdery mildew, leaf and flower blight spot, and crown canker rank high. Never mind the dogwood borer which can run amuck. Turns out, according to the Old Farmer’s Almanac, anthracnose affects many plants and the fungi are spread quickly during rainy seasons.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Dogwood Diseases,AnthracnoseThe Penn State Extension Office’s website has a nifty spreadsheet titled Dogwood Diseases with photos to help ID the dilemmas. It’s organized in columns by diseases name, symptoms, pathogens (a fancy way of saying what caused the disease), and how to manage each. The anthracnose and decline pathogen’s technical name is Discula destructiva You don’t need to know Latin to know what that means – it’s terribly destructive. In fact, deadly over time which is why the much-loved native dogwood (Cornus florida) are rarely seen thriving along wood lines where they love to live. And, the pure species are long gone from nurseries as far as I’ve seen.

Symptoms start out with brown spots on leaves, up to a quarter inch, that often progresses to the tips of leaves becoming blotched with brown dead tissue. The lower branches begin to die on which acne seems to appear – pimply red bumps which are the fruiting parts of the fungus. When in bloom the bracts can be spotty which is kind of pretty, like reddish freckles, until the spots turn brown and distort the bracts. As you would guess, humid soggy conditions such as we’ve had has exasperated the dilemma.

What to do? Rake and destroy leaves that have fallen but don’t remove and destroy the dead twigs until the tree is dormant. For now, take note of the bad branches and remove them in late fall or winter. Next spring you can apply a fungicide during budding to protect the flowers, leaves, and branches. Though I’m not sure how you’d reach the high parts and keep up with spraying every two weeks until the leaves are fully unfurled. Maybe hire a high-reaching professional.

Bottom line, they suggest replacing dying trees with a hybrid of Kousa Dogwood (Cornus kousa, the hardier Asian species) and our native Flowering Dogwood (Cornus florida). Rutgers University has been a pioneer in this hybrid lead by Dr. Elwin Orton who brought to market the Stellar series of dogwoods in 1990 including Cornus ‘Rutgan’ Steller Pink, Ruth Ellen, and Constellation amongst others. All are resistant to the gambit of dogwood diseases including anthracnose and powdery mildew. However, the form of the Steller series of dogwoods is more vase-shaped as compared to the much-loved broad reaching canopy of the Flowering Dogwood.  Still, they are magnificent trees. It took Orton a quarter of a century to breed, evaluate, and improve the hybrid before bringing it to market. Yup, it takes that long to tackle the fungus amongst us with such beauty and grace. Garden dilemmas? AskMaryStone@gmail.com

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Dogwood Diseases,Anthracnose

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Mary Stone, owner of Stone Associates Landscape Design & Consulting. As a Landscape Designer, I am grateful for the joy of helping others beautify their surroundings which often leads to sharing encouragement and life experiences. These relationships inspired my weekly column published in THE PRESS, 'Garden Dilemmas? Ask Mary', began in 2012. I dream of growing the evolving community of readers into an interactive forum to share encouragement and support in Garden and Personal Recoveries - seeking nature’s inspirations, stimulating growth, weeding undesirables, embracing the unexpected. Thank you for visiting! Mary

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