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Boxwood Blight Coming to Town ?

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Boxwood Blight

Hello fellow readers,

I recently learned that Boxwood Blight may be coming to town from Patrick LePore, an associate from Bartlett Tree Experts, who alerted me that it’s been found in Central New Jersey. He was on his way to our client’s Bob and Kathy of Piscataway to assess their boxwood and thankfully no evidence was found. To diagnose Boxwood Blight, Patrick inspects plants for small black leaf lesions or cankers on stems that look like staining or black streaking. “Symptoms don’t show until mid-to-late August and once they are visible, it’s too late,” he explains. In fact, there is no cure for plants once they become infected and the fungus can persist in leaf droppings, mulch, and soil for five to six years. “Prevention is key,” advises Patrick who sites Virginia Tech as the most up to date in spearheading research to remedy Boxwood Blight.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Boxwood Blight

Boxwood Blight

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Boxwood Blight

Photos compliments of Patrick LePore

Boxwood Blight is caused by a fungus, Calonectria pseudonaviculata, and has been impacting plants in the UK for over twenty years. It arrived in the US in 2011 and has spread to over twenty-three states. It’s also called Shoot Blight as water and wind propel spores thereby spreading quickly, making groupings of boxwood highly susceptible. Unlike other fungal boxwood diseases such as volutella where leaves stay on the plant, Boxwood Blight defoliates the plant in as rapidly as one week from infection while the branches stay green. Per the USDA’s Diagnostic Fact Sheet, it’s been found in some cultivars of three species of Buxus specifically Common or European Boxwood (B. sempervirens), Japanese Boxwood (B. microphylla), and Korean Boxwood (B. sinica var. insularis). Pachysandra and Sweetbox (Sarcococca) have been found to be hosts for the spores.

Patrick advises homeowners not to sheer boxwoods, never good for plants, and talk to their landscapers about the sanitation of equipment including wheelbarrows to avoid spreading the sticky spores from house to house. The thing is, it can be transported on clothing and boots as well. Expecting workers to change their clothing let alone sanitize equipment is unlikely; another sound case for one of my biggest pet peeves – sheering plants into meatballs.

Be sure not to overwater boxwood, as they prefer well-drained soil on the dry side and avoid overhead irrigation. Also, be sure not to over-mulch or allow mulch to touch lower branches or trunks.

If you are suspicious you may have a diseased plant, send a photograph to your local extension office and quarantine the diseased plant by removing it with a garbage bag, vacuum the leaf debris and mulch below, and toss it into the trash – not the compost pile as Boxwood Blight is not a fun guy and will readily spread.  Garden Dilemmas? AskMaryStone@gmail.com

Most resistant to Boxwood Blight…

 Virginia Tech offers a PDF of Publication that includes a listing of boxwood cultivars most resistant and least resistant to Boxwood Blight. Of those listed, boxwood I often use in landscape designs that are moderately resistant boxwood includes B. microphylla ‘Winter Gem’,  B. sempervirens ‘Fastigiata’, and B. ‘Green Gem’.  And, the most familiar of those boxwoods considered most resistant are  B. sinica var. insularis ‘Nana’ and B. microphylla var. japonica ‘Green Beauty.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Boxwood Blight

Boxwoods play a key role in my client’s Kathy and Bob’s garden.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Boxwood Blight

Grateful Boxwood Blight has not made its way there.

 

 

Mary Stone, owner of Stone Associates Landscape Design & Consulting. As a Landscape Designer, I am grateful for the joy of helping others beautify their surroundings which often leads to sharing encouragement and life experiences. These relationships inspired my weekly column published in THE PRESS, 'Garden Dilemmas? Ask Mary', began in 2012. I dream of growing the evolving community of readers into an interactive forum to share encouragement and support in Garden and Personal Recoveries - seeking nature’s inspirations, stimulating growth, weeding undesirables, embracing the unexpected. Thank you for visiting! Mary

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