Garden Dilemmas, Delights & Discoveries, Ask Mary Stone, New Jersey Garden blog

Preparing for Winter Gardens

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Preparing your winter garden, Butterfly Bush Invasive, fall garden cleanup

Hello fellow readers,

It’s the time of year for tending to leaves and tidying our gardens for a long winters rest. The truth is though, our gardens don’t rest. The fallen leaves and decaying plant material are providing nourishment for next year’s growth by decomposing and putting nutrients back in the soil. Hence why not doing a thorough garden cleanup makes a good deal of sense. Plus, dry seeds provide food for our feathered friends and dormant foliage provides shelter for birds and beneficial insects cocoons, caterpillars, and eggs. Besides that, dry seed heads and foliage can be beautiful in the garden. Savvy gardeners plan accordingly. Think of your winter garden as a dry floral arrangement with the added benefit of evergreens.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Preparing your winter garden, fall garden cleanup, Winter Garden, Ornamental Grass in Winter

Most know how lovely ornamental grasses are left standing over winter.

Most know how lovely ornamental grasses are left standing. Then there’s the pompom-like black eyed Susan seed heads (Rudbeckia hirta) that are especially cute frosted with snow. However, “rude Becky” can make too many babies. Same can be true of purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea), so I leave only a few seed heads in key spots for winter interest. The new growth of Butterfly Bush (Buddleja davidii pictured above) looks like starbursts. They too have prolific seeds that disperse easily, why many categorize it invasive. I cut off the dry seeds and dispose them in the takeaway trash and prune back the plants for a tidier display over winter. Come spring, they’re cut down to a foot high to rejuvenate each plant.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Preparing your winter garden, fall garden cleanup, Winter Garden, Hydrangea in Winter

Hydrangeas look fabulous over winter… like a dry floral arrangement.

The handsome husks of Siberian iris (Iris sibirica) have split tops that look liplike with black seeds that rattle in the wind. Late blooming ornamental onions (Allium) such as ‘Summer Beauty’ and ‘Millenium’ are magnificent dry. Then there’s Sea hollies (Eryngium) with cone-like flowers that dehydrate intact. Many salvias, such as Salvia nemerosa and S. pratensis, provide winter texture long after their blooms fade away. St. John’s Wort (Hypericum calycinum) is a semi evergreen groundcover with rosebud-like dry seedpods. Hydrangeas look fabulous over winter too. There’s panicle hydrangea (Hydrangea paniculate) that bloom from mid-summer into fall, then turn golden wheat. My favored oakleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia) has pealing rust-colored bark to compliment the dry flowerheads.

With this fall’s extended warmth, some plants are not yet dormant. So, you neat and tidies, be careful not to cut back plants too early. And when you do, consider keeping some seeds and foliage intact for the critters and for the nourishment of our dear earth. Garden Dilemmas? Askmarystone@gmail.com

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Preparing your winter garden, fall garden cleanup, Winter Garden

How beautiful a winter landscape can be, especially with a bit of frosting!

 

Mary Stone, owner of Stone Associates Landscape Design & Consulting. As a Landscape Designer, I am grateful for the joy of helping others beautify their surroundings which often leads to sharing encouragement and life experiences. These relationships inspired my weekly column published in THE PRESS, 'Garden Dilemmas? Ask Mary', began in 2012. I dream of growing the evolving community of readers into an interactive forum to share encouragement and support in Garden and Personal Recoveries - seeking nature’s inspirations, stimulating growth, weeding undesirables, embracing the unexpected. Thank you for visiting! Mary
  1. Sally Field Reply

    Great point about letting some of the foliage fall and rest on the ground. Nature has a fantastic way of recycling itself, and yet still being so beautiful.

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