Garden Dilemmas, Delights & Discoveries, Ask Mary Stone, New Jersey Garden blog

Easter Wisdom from Mettler’s Woods

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Mary Stone, Mettler's Woods

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Mary Stone, Mettler's WoodsHello fellow readers,

On the second day of Spring, we braced for another round of blinding snow and high winds. Instead, a peaceful eight inches of fluff fell. Good thing as we were all weary. The snow melted quickly as temperatures warmed. Spring is here at last! But the cleanup of fallen trees from our two nor’easters seems overwhelming. I came across an article in AMC Outdoors (Sept/Oct 2017 issue) with comforting wisdom worthy to share.

In the article, Bringing New Life to Old Growth, Lindsay Konkel talks about a 65-acre ancient forest in Somerset NJ called Mettler’s Woods with old hardwood trees that “predate the Revolutionary war.”  Old growth forests are rare in the Northeast due to logging and farming by our early settlers.

Mettler’s Woods has a vast history. Growth rings on ancient fallen trees show cycles of fire every decade. Presumably, the Lenni-Lenape, who occupied the region until the 1700’s, created the burns to open up sightlines for hunting and to promote understory growth. After that, Dutch settlers inhabited the land which was passed down generations to the Mettler family. In the 1950’s core samples of oaks and beech that toppled in a hurricane showed some over 350 years old, which spiked the interest of a logging company to purchase the land. Instead, a committee of citizens and the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners bought the property and donated it to Rutgers University in 1955. It became officially named Hutcheson Memorial Forest.

In recent years the ancient forest has declined dramatically. Trees have fallen in storms and from old age. Suburban sprawl has caused deer populations to explode decimating saplings that would replace the aging trees. Plus, they’ve devastated native understory plants, allowing invasive species such as Japanese barberry, garlic mustard, privet, and multiflora rose to take over just as they have here.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Mary Stone, Mettler's Woods

Sadly, dozens of trees tumbled in our woods during the first March nor’easter

One of the stipulations of the donation to Rutgers was the forest was to remain unmanaged. Let nature run its course. Let trees lay where they fall. The article mentions fallen trees leave gaps in the earth that serve as vernal pools providing a critical habitat for amphibians. Which makes me less sad over the dozen trees that tumbled in our woods leaving massive roots thrice my height. It’s a natural process for trees to fall and decay. They fertilize and prepare the soil for more trees to sprout in the newfound opening of light. Nature has a cycle, just as we do, just as the seasons of time. With endings, come new beginnings and the hope for new life. So long nor’easters. Happy Easter to all!

Garden Dilemmas? Askmarystone@gmail.com

Free tours of Hutchinson Memorial Forest are scheduled year-round on Sundays. Visit www.hmf.rutgers.edu to learn more.

 

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Mary Stone, Mettler's Woods

Spring Beauties

One of the native wildflowers to remain in Mettler’s Woods, and one of the first to show in spring, are spring beauties (Claytonia virginica) which can endure grazing, deer are not big fans, and survive even if there are only a few trees surrounding them. They’re even edible and tasty for humans, but don’t eat the ones out in nature. Grow your own. You can buy your own corms (underground plant stems). Their clusters of star-like light pink or white flowers with tiny pink strips dance atop dark green grassy leaves in early spring. The foliage remains after the bloom and grows to about a foot high before going dormant in late spring.

Mary Stone, owner of Stone Associates Landscape Design & Consulting. As a Landscape Designer, I am grateful for the joy of helping others beautify their surroundings which often leads to sharing encouragement and life experiences. These relationships inspired my weekly column published in THE PRESS, 'Garden Dilemmas? Ask Mary', began in 2012. I dream of growing the evolving community of readers into an interactive forum to share encouragement and support in Garden and Personal Recoveries - seeking nature’s inspirations, stimulating growth, weeding undesirables, embracing the unexpected. Thank you for visiting! Mary

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