Garden Dilemmas, Delights & Discoveries, Ask Mary Stone, New Jersey Garden blog

Bagworms Baby !

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Bagworms, Arborvitae pests,Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis,Thuja occidentalis

Hello fellow readers,

While sitting with Mom outside her nursing home in Virginia I noticed what looked like a crust of bread being hauled off by an ant. I marvel at how much an ant can carry – ten to fifty times their body weight they say. Mom, who inspired my gardening start, isn’t able to talk much anymore. Still, we share the joy of observing nature.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Bagworms, Arborvitae pests,Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis,Thuja occidentalis

Bagworm on the Move

After lunch we revisited the spot. The Hospice nurse came to pay a visit and noticed the two and a half inch ‘crust’ was crawling within a few feet of Mom’s wheelchair. We observed the mysterious sack of brown needles from a nearby arborvitae shrub (Thuja occidentalis) being moved by the resident wormy thingy. The entire lower section of the arborvitae appeared dead. Upon closer inspection, the evergreen shrub with its scale-like leaves had several sacks of browned needles which look like pinecone ornaments. On the ground were dropped sacks of bagworms (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis) which are among the most damaging insects to arborvitae, juniper, pine, and spruce. They also can attack deciduous trees such as locust and sycamore. That evening I researched the lifecycle of bagworms.

Bagworms are dark brown caterpillars that grow an inch long all the while adding to the bag they live in, built from the plant material they feed on. The females live their entire life in the bag. The adult males become black moths that mate with the females, who then lay up to 1,000 eggs and die. The eggs overwinter in the bag and hatch in late spring. Then the tiny caterpillars spin a silk strand 1 to 3 feet long that catches in the wind and carries them wherever the wind blows. This resourceful mode of transportation is called “ballooning” which they may repeat until they land on a suitable host. They then begin constructing their own bags as they feed on the foliage. A heavy infestation of bagworms can completely defoliate and kill a shrub. The easiest way to get rid of bagworms is to pick them off and drown them in a bucket of water mixed with a few tablespoons of liquid soap.

It’s curious to me why Mom’s bagworm was on the move. Turns out they take their bags with them to find fresh feeding areas. Yet there was still plenty to eat on the host arborvitae. Sometimes it’s just time to move on.

Garden Dilemmas? askmarystone@gmail.com

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Bagworms, Arborvitae pests,Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis,Thuja occidentalis

Arborvitae Damaged by Bagworm (Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis)

Side note: For bagworms out of reach there are biological controls safe for birds and beneficial insects such as spraying with the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) after the larvae have hatched in the spring. The bagworms eat the treated foliage, sicken and die. There’s also a beneficial nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae that feeds on bagworms. The nematodes must be sprayed onto the bags before the female bagworm lays her eggs.

Mary Stone, owner of Stone Associates Landscape Design & Consulting. As a Landscape Designer, I am grateful for the joy of helping others beautify their surroundings which often leads to sharing encouragement and life experiences. These relationships inspired my weekly column published in THE PRESS, 'Garden Dilemmas? Ask Mary', began in 2012. I dream of growing the evolving community of readers into an interactive forum to share encouragement and support in Garden and Personal Recoveries - seeking nature’s inspirations, stimulating growth, weeding undesirables, embracing the unexpected. Thank you for visiting! Mary

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