Garden Dilemmas, Delights & Discoveries, Ask Mary Stone, New Jersey Garden blog

A Plethora of Fungi

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Mushrooms in Mulch

Hello Fellow Readers,

Jeanne of Blairstown shared a fungi dilemma; an alien looking plethora of mushrooms amongst her garden mulch. Mushrooms are the fruit of valuable spores that decay organic material and recycle nutrients back into soil which is good for plants. However, in volumes they’re unsightly in the garden. The good news is most mushrooms are not toxic and do not cause disease; though a few are poisonous if eaten so keep curious critters and kids away.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Mushrooms in Mulch, Slime Mold

Slime Mold looks like a dog hurled (sorry if you’re eating breakfast)

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Mushrooms in Mulch

Mushrooms are good for our earth but unsightly in the garden

There are many types of mushrooms – from the classic toadstool, to smelly finger-like stinkhorns that attract insects. There’s the puff balls I loved to pounce as a kid to release black clouds of spores. Then there’s the bright pink, orange or yellow slime mold that looks like a dog hurled (sorry if you’re eating breakfast). Groups of birds nest mushrooms look like little eggs inside cups. There’s the dreaded artillery fungus that creates clusters of minute orange-brown or cream cups with black specks in the center which shoots tarlike spores onto siding, walkways, even on cars that’s impossible to remove.

Mulch should never be more than two or three inches thick as too much inhibits air circulation needed for root health. Plus, too thick mulch will create a mat that hinders moisture from getting through to roots and kills microorganisms which prevent spores from going into fruit…meaning mushrooms.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Mushrooms in Mulch, Artillary Fungus,

Too thick mulch encourages mushroom growth

Moisture, cool temperatures and shade provide ideal environments for mushrooms. Hand watering plants at their roots or with drip irrigation, rather than using sprinklers, will help limit mushroom colonies. While fungicides are used in lawns to treat short lived fungi like leaf spot and root rot, it won’t help fungi that create mushrooms. Rather, rake mulch periodically to interrupt the fungi cycle inhibiting them to fruit. If mushrooms have formed, remove and toss them in a bag to dispose of to prevent further spreading of spores.

Mushrooms prefer acidic soil. Though adding lime can make soil more alkaline, it would negatively impact other acid loving plants. They say two tablespoons of baking soda mixed with a gallon of water won’t change the chemistry or pH of soil, but will disrupt the ideal conditions for fungi growth.

While you can refresh decaying mulch by adding a half inch of fresh mulch on top, once mushrooms begin running amuck it’s time to remove and install new. Add the old much to the compost pile, turning every few months, to create compost soil. In fact, using organic compost soil instead of mulch is a nourishing alternative for your plants and its already broken down so mushrooms won’t have much to feed on.

Penn State researchers discovered blending four parts of used mushroom compost, also sold as mushroom soil, to ten parts of mulch greatly impedes artillery fungus and other annoying fungi because it contains beneficial microbes that destroy it. Plus, mushroom soil, the byproduct of edible mushroom production, will give a boost to plant growth. If you can’t beat ‘em join ‘em.

Garden Dilemmas? Askmarystone@gmail.com

Mary Stone, owner of Stone Associates Landscape Design & Consulting. As a Landscape Designer, I am grateful for the joy of helping others beautify their surroundings which often leads to sharing encouragement and life experiences. These relationships inspired my weekly column published in THE PRESS, 'Garden Dilemmas? Ask Mary', began in 2012. I dream of growing the evolving community of readers into an interactive forum to share encouragement and support in Garden and Personal Recoveries - seeking nature’s inspirations, stimulating growth, weeding undesirables, embracing the unexpected. Thank you for visiting! Mary

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