Garden Dilemmas, Delights & Discoveries, Ask Mary Stone, New Jersey Garden blog

Queen Anne’s Anomaly

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Queen Anne's Lace,Daucus carota, Wild Carrot

Hello fellow readers,

While on a road walk with Miss Ellie I came across a pinkish Queen Anne’s Lace flower with dark magenta edges on a plant where all the other flowers were the customary cream. What a gorgeous anomaly! It reminded me of grade school when we’d cut Queen Anne’s Lace and put them in water with food coloring to change the color.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Queen Anne's Lace,Daucus carota, Wild Carrot

Queen Anne’s Lace anomaly

Queen Anne’s Lace, Daucus carota, is also called Wild Carrot. In fact today’s edible carrots were once cultivated from this plant. Like carrots, the D. carota root is edible while young before becoming too woody to eat. Be careful when collecting Queen Anne’s Lace as it resembles Poison Hemlock and Fool’s Parsley; both with similar flowers. But the Queen Anne’s Lace flowers are much tighter and only her roots smells like carrots. She’s second to beets in level of sugar and is sometimes used to sweeten puddings and other foods.

They say both Queen Anne of Great Britain, and her great grandmother Anne of Denmark are for whom the plant is named. Once introduced to North America she naturalized and thrives in dry fields, ditches, and other open spots. Each flower cluster is comprised of tiny white flowers that resembles lace. Some have a teeny dark red flower in the center and, as the story is told, represents a blood droplet where Queen Anne pricked herself while making the lace. She blooms from May to October and, as a biennial, lives for two years and only blooms her second year.

‘So is it a weed or a wildflower?’ asked my better half Curt. ‘A weed is a misplaced plant,’ my standard response, as many plants in the wild (and in my garden) are keepers though others may consider them weeds.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Queen Anne's Lace,Daucus carota, Wild Carrot

Ellie with Queen Anne

Queen Anne’s Lace is used as a companion plant to crops. It can boost tomato plant production when kept nearby and provide a microclimate of cooler, moister air for lettuce when intercropped with it. On the other hand, the USDA has listed it as a pest in pastures as their seeds persist for two to five years. Yet beneficial bugs such as caterpillars of the Eastern Black Swallowtail butterfly eat the leaves and pollinators drink the nectar. So a weed or a wildflower? It’s in the eye of the beholder and she’s a beauty!

Garden Dilemmas? askmarystone@gmail.com

 

I came across a Queen Anne’s Lace jelly recipe which sounds ticklish on the tongue to me but maybe worth a try:

2 cups fresh Queen Anne’s lace flowers

4 cups water

1/4 cup lemon juice

1 package powdered pectin

3 1/2 cups plus 2 tbsp. organic cane sugar

Bring water to boil. Remove from heat and let cool 5 minutes. Add flower heads and push them down into the water until fully covered. Cover and steep one half hour. Strain.

Measure 3 cups of the liquid into a pot. Add lemon juice and pectin. Stirring constantly, bring to a rolling boil. Add sugar and stir constantly. Cook and stir until mixture comes to a rolling boil then boil one minute longer. Remove from heat. Skim.

Pour into sterilized jars leaving 1/4” head space. Process in a hot water bath for 5 minutes.

Found on: http://www.ediblewildfood.com/queen-annes-lace.aspx

 

 

 

Mary Stone, owner of Stone Associates Landscape Design & Consulting. As a Landscape Designer, I am grateful for the joy of helping others beautify their surroundings which often leads to sharing encouragement and life experiences. These relationships inspired my weekly column published in THE PRESS, 'Garden Dilemmas? Ask Mary', began in 2012. I dream of growing the evolving community of readers into an interactive forum to share encouragement and support in Garden and Personal Recoveries - seeking nature’s inspirations, stimulating growth, weeding undesirables, embracing the unexpected. Thank you for visiting! Mary

Leave a Reply

*

captcha *