Garden Dilemmas, Delights & Discoveries, Ask Mary Stone, New Jersey Garden blog

Proper Planting Hillside

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Resilient Red Maple, Tree Sealer, Planting on a hill

Hello Fellow Readers,

In the Spring of 2011 my sister Dot, who lives in Chesterfield Virginia, planted a Red maple (Acer rubrum) in the tiered garden she and her hubby built to manage the slope in their back yard. At the time our dear Mom had just moved in and I recall her reminiscences over how hard Dot and Jim worked on the project weekend after weekend. Mom especially admired the maple tree with its red tinged emerging leaves and glorious fall color. She had missed the change of seasons over the 30 years she lived in Florida.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Resilient Red Maple, Tree Sealer, Planting on a hill

Early red tinge of new growth on Red maple (Acer rubrum)

In August of the same year, Hurricane Irene came through gusting eighty mile-an-hour winds that took down a two-foot caliber oak and a handful of surrounding trees. Thankfully the new maple remained standing, though Dot and Jim had to straighten the newbie whose leaves were battered and bark severely damaged on the side of the fallen oak. Soon after, limbs began to die back which they pruned year after year. Dot asked if I’d assess the remaining half a tree. Symptoms of one sided-ness are often a sign that part of the root system is not taking up proper nourishment or moisture; one of the risks of planting on a slope. The wound on the trunk surely another contributing factor.

When planting trees and shrubs on a slope you need to create a platform by elevating the downhill side, cutting into the hill, or a combination of both to create a flat space for the tree to be planted. The flat space should be at least three times the width of the root ball (I prefer five times the root ball for large trees) and firm enough to stand on while planting. When adding soil on the down side of the hill, secure the soil with rocks or a retaining wall. Then follow proper planting protocols of digging the hole 2 to 3 times the width of the root ball and only as deep as the root ball. Supplement the soil with rich organic matter, firmly filling the hole to eliminate air pockets. Fertilizing at the time of planting can add to plant stress so wait until after the plant is established. Top with 2 to 3 inches of undyed wood mulch (my fav is hemlock mulch) making sure to keep it clear of trunks or stems to prevent disease.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Resilient Red Maple, Tree Sealer, Planting on a hill

“Hi Sis. Here a picture of the recovering red maple. Isn’t the new growth wonderful? A promise of rebirth and new beginnings.”

It turns out Dot and Jim’s platform was not large enough. When they removed the mulch, they found the roots were indeed exposed. They put on their DIY hats to remediate the situation by extending the retaining wall and adding topsoil. Over the last three years since the remediation the tree didn’t rebound. Sadly, last fall it was decided come spring they would cut it down. Especially sad knowing how much Mom admired the tree.

Lo and behold as the tree woke up this spring, the canopy looks as though it’s filling in on the empty side; as if the tree is finding its new balance which lifts our hearts. Dot emailed a picture of the revival. “Mom’s tree is making an astounding recovery!” Plants truly are resilient especially with the love and admiration of caregivers. It’s comforting to imagine that Mom may still have a nurturing influence from above. Happy Memorial Day. Garden Dilemmas? Askmarystone@gmail.com

About Pruning Sealers: Normally I don’t recommend pruning sealers as they can trap moisture and encourage disease and decay. However, after hearing about the insect invasion issues on the trunk wound Dot had been managing with insecticides, her decision to paint the tree with the black stuff was warranted. She even taped off the good bark before spraying the sealer.  Leave it to my dear sister – no caregiving details are ever left undone.

Mary Stone, Garden Dilemmas, Ask Mary Stone,Gardening tips, Garden Blogs, Stone Associates Landscape Design, Garden Blog, Resilient Red Maple, Tree Sealer, Planting on a hill, Emma Stone, Dot Lyon

My sister Dot with Mom May 2013. No caregiving details ever left undone…

Mary Stone, owner of Stone Associates Landscape Design & Consulting. As a Landscape Designer, I am grateful for the joy of helping others beautify their surroundings which often leads to sharing encouragement and life experiences. These relationships inspired my weekly column published in THE PRESS, 'Garden Dilemmas? Ask Mary', began in 2012. I dream of growing the evolving community of readers into an interactive forum to share encouragement and support in Garden and Personal Recoveries - seeking nature’s inspirations, stimulating growth, weeding undesirables, embracing the unexpected. Thank you for visiting! Mary

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